Beginner Sports Bettor: Every different odds type

Here is a list of every different odds type out there, this is essential information for every beginning sports bettor.

Odds Notations

“If you have 2 in odds for Liverpool to win and they do your return will be your stake multiplied with the odds.” Read more here.

What is 1X2 betting? 

“1 represents a home win, X is a draw and 2 is an away win. It really is that simple.” Read more here.

What is Asain Handicap?

“In games where there is a clear favourite, the odds might be unfavourable. Therefore, bookmakers offer a handicap in order to create desirable bets on both the favourite and the underdog.” Read more here.

What is European Handicap?

“European handicap is almost the same as Asain Handicap, but with one clear distinction. With the European, draws are possible, and they result in you losing your bet.” Read more here

What is Draw No Bet?

“As the name suggests, it is characterized by the fact that you get your money back in case the match ends in a draw.” Read more here.

What is Moneyline betting?

“Moneyline is the easiest form of betting, in which you bet on either of two teams to win.” Read more here.

How does betting on the Moneyline work?

Check out our video on Moneyline betting here.

What are Totals or Over/Unders?

“A total or over/under is a bet on whether the combined number of points in a single game will be over or under a given value.” Read more here.

Odds Formats

“Understanding the odds of a game is essential for the sports trading world, so you know how much you could expect from each bet.” Read more here.

What is the Point Spread?

Do you want to bet on the superior team in any matchup? For that to happen you must understand the Point Spread in Sports Betting.” Read more here.

How does betting on the Point Spread work?

Check out our video on Point Spread’s here.

What are odds and how you should look at them?

“In most places related to sports and betting you will see the odds of a team winning rather than the probability.” Read more here

What is a bet and how you should look at them?

“When trying to understand what a bet is most of us need to change or perspective on what it really means to place a bet.” Read more here

What is “A Push” in betting?

“A push occurs when the result of a sporting event ends as a tie between the sports bettor and the sportsbook.” Read more here.

Now that you know some of the basics, take a look at some successful betting strategies here.

What is Middle Betting?

Middling is similar to arbitrage betting, where the aim is to exploit the different prices between bookmakers. Middles occur in Asian Handicap and Over/Under markets and can provide some juicy returns, but also some big losses. There are three types of middles; Positive Middles, Negative Middles and Polish (Inverted) Middles.

Positive Middling

This type of middling is the most valuable as there is no chance of loss, but they can be quite difficult to find. To illustrate positive middling, we’ll use an Asian Handicap betting situation. For positive middling to work, you need to find a market where two bookies intersect and the staking has been calculated to ensure a profitable return. Below is a hypothetical example of a game between Liverpool and Norwich and the four possible outcomes.

Liverpool (-2 goals) 1.90 @ Bookie X (Stake $51.5 for a $46.35 profit)

Norwich (+3 goals) 2.25 @ Bookie Y (Stake $43.5 for a $54.37 profit)

You can not lose when placing a Positive Middle bet.

You can not lose when placing a Positive Middle bet.

Possible Outcome 1

Liverpool win by less than 2 goals, game is drawn or Liverpool lose.

  • You lose the (-2) bet at Bookie X

  • You win the (+3) bet at Bookie Y

Profit = $54.37 - $51.5 = $2.87

Possible Outcome 2

Liverpool win by more than 3 goals

  • You win the (-2) bet at Bookie X

  • You lose the (+3) bet at Bookie Y

Profit = $46.35 - $43.5 = $2.85

Possible Outcome 3

Liverpool win by exactly 2 goals

  • Your (-2) bet for Liverpool is refunded at Bookie X

  • You win the (+3) bet for Norwich at Bookie Y

Profit = $0 + $54.37 = $54.37

Possible Outcome 4

Liverpool win by exactly 3 goals

  • You win the (-2) bet for Liverpool at Bookie X

  • Your (+3) bet for Norwich is refunded at Bookie Y

Profit = $46.35 + $0 = $46.35

Negative Middling

This type of middling is more risky as most of the time you will lose a small percentage of your outlay, but there is a small chance of both bets winning, meaning huge profits. See our example below using an Over/Under market (assuming we put $100 on each bet).

Bookie X - Real Madrid vs Barcelona Total Goals  = Under 3.5 goals @ 1.90

Bookie Y - Real Madrid vs Barcelona Total Goals  = Over 2.5 goals @ 1.90

Possible Outcome 1

Total goals scored in the game is 4 or more

  • Your bet with Bookie Y (Over 2.5 goals) wins - $100 x 1.90 = $90 profit

  • Your bet with Bookie X (Under 3.5 goals) loses = $100 loss

Profit = A loss of $10

Possible Outcome 2

Total goals scored in the game is 2 or less

  • Your bet with Bookie Y (Over 2.5 goals) loses = $100 loss

  • Your bet with Bookie X (Under 3.5 goals) wins - $100 x 1.90 = $90 profit

Profit = A loss of $10

Possible Outcome 3

Total goals scored in the game is 3

  • Your bet with Bookie Y (Over 2.5 goals) wins - $100 x 1.90 = $90 profit

  • Your bet with Bookie X (Under 3.5 goals) wins - $100 x 1.90 = $90 profit

Profit = $90 + $90 = $180

Is Negative Middling useful?

Let’s take a look at how useful this method of betting is, in other words, how often do you need the middle to land in order to break-even. If you won your first ever middle bet you pocket $180, which means if you lose the next 18 bets you can sustain the $180 (assuming the odds and staking are the exact same every 18 bets). So, if this middle bet lands more than once every nineteen games, your strategy has a positive expected value.

Polish (Inverted) Middles

This type of middling is the opposite to negative middling, to obtain a profit you want the Asian Handicap or the Over/Under to fall outside of the middle. Polish Middling is perhaps the most dangerous type of middling as there is a chance you can lose both of your bets, but there is a greater chance you will earn a small profit. See our example below (assuming we put $100 on each bet).

Liverpool (-3.5 goals) 2.25 @ Bookie X 

Norwich (+2.5 goals) 2.25 @ Bookie Y 

Polish Middling is like backing a 1.125 favourite.

Polish Middling is like backing a 1.125 favourite.

Possible Outcome 1

Liverpool win by 4 or more goals

  • You win the (-3.5) bet at Bookie X

  • You lose the (+2.5) bet at Bookie Y

Profit - $125 - $100 = $25

Possible Outcome 2

Liverpool win by 2 or less goals, draw, or lose

  • You lose the (-3.5) bet at Bookie X

  • You win the (+2.5) bet at Bookie Y

Profit - $125 - $100 = $25

Possible Outcome 3

Liverpool win by exactly 3 goals

  • You lose the (-3.5) bet at Bookie X

  • You lose the (+2.5) bet at Bookie Y

Profit = A loss totalling $200

Is Polish Middling useful?

Just like we did with Negative Middles, let’s take a look at how useful this method of betting is. If you lost your first ever middle bet you lose $200, which means you would have to win your next eight bets to retrieve your $200 (assuming the odds and staking are the exact same every eight bets). So, if your bet hits the middle more than once out of every nine games, your strategy has a negative expected value.

So, is middling worth it?

It’s definitely worth it if there is considerable disagreement in the market between bookies. But bettors need to remember that betting a Negative Middle is the equivalent of backing a long shot, and betting a Polish Middle is the same as putting your money on a 1.125 favourite. 

Value Betting is the best way to beat the Bookies

In general we consider value betting to be a superior method to any form of arbitrage betting. This is why we chose to build our service around value betting. You can read more about why value betting is more profitable than arbing here.

Check out some of our other articles similar to this one:

What is the Point Spread in Sports Betting and How You Can Bet on the Spread

Do you want to bet on the superior team in any matchup? Do you want to bet on teams such as the Golden State Warriors, The New England Patriots or the Clemson Tigers? For that to happen you must understand the Point Spread in Sports Betting.

In this article, you will learn and understand a different angle to sports betting you might not have thought about before.

The Point Spread and the Moneyline:

Imagine a game of any sport. It could be football, basketball, baseball; you name it. Looking at the matchup, one of the two teams immediately jumps out as being the favorite to win the game. Let’s name this “Team A”. The opposing side to Team A would be the underdog, named “Team B”.

The Moneyline (betting strictly on which team wins the game) would normally favor Team A to win the game, as they are seen as the superior team (To get a better understanding of the moneyline, you can watch this video). Betting on Team A would result in a lesser return, due to a lower odds when the probability for a win is high.

At the other hand, the moneyline would indicate that the probability for Team B to win is lower than Team A. The odds would therefore be higher, and would result in a greater return on your bet.

The Point Spread evens out the moneyline:

To even out the odds in bets, the bookmakers give a disadvantage to the favorite to win, Team A, and give an advantage to the underdog in the matchup, Team B. This situation is an addition to the already given moneyline, and aims to balance the odds of the particular game.

This is commonly known as being the Point Spread. Just to clarify, the Moneyline, is the Point Spread which is the closest to 50/50 win probability or giving 2.0/2.0 in odds on each of the two teams.

The Point Spread in an example:

Let’s look at a hypothetical example from a game between the mentioned Team A and Team B in basketball;

Learn how to understand the Point Spread in Sports Betting.

Learn how to understand the Point Spread in Sports Betting.

Team A is predicted as the favorite to win the matchup, due to a number of factors, such as form, home-field advantage and injuries to the opponent’s top player. We imagine the odds for a win for Team A to be 1,50. This means that if you win, you get back what you initially put on the game, in addition to 50% of what you originally betted.

The odds for Team B would be much higher, at a level of 2,50. Here, if you win, you would get back what you initially put on the game, in addition to 150% of what you originally betted.

However, when the bookmakers seek to even out the odds, they set up a Spread on the game.

This means that they create a chance for people to bet on the game with a handicap, meaning that Team A has to beat Team B by a certain amount of points, scores or goals, in this case points.

If we say that Team A has a Point Spread of -7,5 it means that they are favored to win by this amount of points. For you to win betting on this Point Spread, Team A must win by 7,5 points or more, practically meaning that they must win by 8 points.

By betting on a Point Spread of -7,5 the odds have risen to a 2,00, because they have to do more than simply just win.

The Point Spread for Team B would be at +7,5. This means that they have been given a head start of 7,5 points, and that they “win” as long as they don’t lose by 8 points or more.

When a team is given an advantage like this, the odds will drop accordingly, and in this case it drops to a level of 2,00.

As it is impossible to score half points, this bet would either be won or lost from a bettor’s perspective.

The Point Spread with even numbers:

If the Point Spread is at an even number, for example -3 for Team A and +3 for Team B, one more outcome would be possible. If Team A defeats Team B by exactly 3 points, and evens out the Point Spread, the game would be a no-contest, and your initial investment in the game would return to your account.

When to use the Point Spread?

Consider using the Point Spread when a team has a monumental advantage over the opposition, and that this advantage outweighs the disadvantage given by the bookmaker. It is also effective in the opposite situation, where the advantage given by the bookmakers for the underdog outweighs the difference in quality between the two teams.

The Point Spread is therefore an opportunity that should be taken advantage of by bettors, and should be considered an alternative to betting strictly on the moneyline of a game.

Click here to watch our videos on the Point Spread.

Do you know the different odds types? 

We have written articles explaining them: